Reflections for Lent: Creative Contributions to the Scriptures and Sermons during the Lenten Season.

Easter Sunday
Reflections on Easter by Claire and Tony Fortune

As long as the earth endures…seasons…will never cease.
~~Genesis 8:22

This past dreary winter of uncertainty dragged endlessly on. But we could take heart in one of God’s promises that season will follow season.

So, as we know it will, on a certain day around Eastertime, miracles begin to take place.  The scraggly sticks that have bordered our yards all winter open into bright yellow forsythia blooms.  The sturdy jonquils that were planted in our neighbor’s yard generations ago burst through their underground hiding place to withstand yet another spring snow, then to enliven the hillside.

Apple and pear trees and azaleas shrubs that seemed hopelessly dead, startle us with their rainbow blossoms.

Springtime—Easter—has arrived, just as we knew it would.

And although there are different ways to observe Easter—sometimes with colored eggs and chocolate bunnies and fancy brunches, to many of us Easter’s message of rebirth is central to our faith.  All the little flowering resurrections that are brightening our world help our hearts blossom in hope and spiritual renewal.
Claire and Tony Fortune

 Behold, God makes all things (including us) new.
                                                             ~~Revelations 21:5

Claire adds~~

I’m including a song I learned in Sunday school about 80 years ago.  Its simple words are just as meaningful to me at this stage as they were when I sang them as a little child.  Maybe you’d like to sing them, too.

Palm Sunday

Reflections on Palm Sunday by Suzie Fisk:  Watch Video on YouTube

Fifth Sunday in Lent

Reflections on Lent from the Comfort Makers:  Watch Video on YouTube

Fourth Sunday in Lent

Dan Akerblom shows us his farm with lessons for Easter: Watch Video on YouTube

Third Sunday in Lent
Lectionary for March 7; John 2
Jesus Clears the Temple Courts

13 When it was almost time for the Jewish Passover, Jesus went up to Jerusalem. 14 In the temple courts he found people selling cattle, sheep and doves, and others sitting at tables exchanging money. 15 So he made a whip out of cords, and drove all from the temple courts, both sheep and cattle; he scattered the coins of the money changers and overturned their tables. 16 To those who sold doves he said, “Get these out of here! Stop turning my Father’s house into a market!” 17 His disciples remembered that it is written: “Zeal for your house will consume me.”[c]

18 The Jews then responded to him, “What sign can you show us to prove your authority to do all this?”

19 Jesus answered them, “Destroy this temple, and I will raise it again in three days.”

20 They replied, “It has taken forty-six years to build this temple, and you are going to raise it in three days?” 21 But the temple he had spoken of was his body. 22 After he was raised from the dead, his disciples recalled what he had said. Then they believed the scripture and the words that Jesus had spoken.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Sunday in Lent

Reflections on the Scripture
By Janet Speer

Mark 8: 33
But when Jesus turned and looked at his disciples, he rebuked Peter. “Get behind me, Satan!” he said. “You do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns.”

Jesus gives us a daunting directive. With COVID, unrest, illnesses and even death, we are consumed with “human” concerns. I have friends in the hospital, a grandbaby I cannot visit, I’m not directing plays, and my sweet little dog is doing poorly. I am overwhelmed with human (and dog) concerns. There are a few things, however, that can bring me out of my doldrums. The photograph you see shows a few of the poinsettias I rescued from the church. (I do this each year.) I wait until everyone has what they want then I bring the rest home. I’ve have even dug them out of the dumpster. I have 23 of these ruby red beauties lined up across our front windows; windows that welcome the sun throughout the house all winter. The poinsettias remind me of the people who placed them in our church . They remind me of the glory they brought to our souls at Christmas time, even though they were delivered virtually. I find Jesus’ message weighty, but also enlightening; literally. The light of God is the light of hope. If we are only about human concerns, we tend to forget where hope originates. My pretty poinsettias remind me to be on the lookout for hope. So, I’ll baby them all winter, and in the summer, they’ll make a big splash of red in my garden, bringing my beloved congregation outside with me for a breath of clean fresh air.

And oh – I almost forgot—the purple orchid is one my husband got for me over a year ago. I had about given up on it when it said, “I’ll show her!” and began to bloom, and bloom, and bloom. Talk about renewed hope! It sits with the poinsettias but won’t be allowed outside in the summer. (Orchids think they are princesses, you know. )

 

The Desert; a poem for the First Sunday in Lent
By the Children of Banner Elk Presbyterian

The desert is thought to be a dry, barren place
And
As Christians we try to avoid it
However,
God can help us to grow and flourish there if we let Him.

The desert is a hot, sandy, and lonely place
But
It looks inviting and warm,
Like the sun rays have formed the sand

The sand looks like the ocean
And
The wind is blowing
I think there are cactuses.
I think it is hot.

There’s a big road that goes through the middle of it
But
You can walk through the sand
Because
It has sand like the beach with lots of sunshine
And
It has pretty blue skies
And
It will have a pretty sunset of orange and red.

There are animal tracks!
And
There are camels somewhere.
Ah
The desert looks hot and I see a lot of camels.
And
It’s hot with lots of animals like lizards, camels, and rattle snakes.
But
Be careful of the quicksand!

The desert reminds me of Lent
And Jesus’ journey through the desert of temptation
To the joy of Resurrection.

Art work by Pre-school

The Children’s names with their contribution the poem

The desert is thought to be a dry, barren place, and as Christians we try to avoid it. However
God can help us to grow and flourish there if we let Him. Kaelin Braverman

“It looks inviting and warm. Like the sun rays have formed the sand.” From Katariina Marriott
Pepper Henley says “it’s hot with lots of animals like lizards, camels and rattle snakes. There is a big road that goes through the middle of it.”

Piper Henley says, “it has sand like the beach with lots of sunshine.”

Jackson Best- The desert is a hot, sandy, and lonely place.

Keller Best – The desert reminds me of Lent and Jesus’ journey through the desert of temptation to the joy of the Resurrection.

Libby Ennis: The desert looks hot and I see a lot of camels.

Pre-school
I think it’s Hot!
I think there are cactuses.
It has pretty blue skies.
It will have a pretty sunset of orange and red.
You can walk through the sand.
There are camels somewhere.
The sand looks like the ocean.
The wind is blowing.
There are animal tracks.
Be careful of the quicksand.